In This Issue

  • Report from the Chair
  • Project Update
  • ACHORD Seen & Heard
  • Recent Literature
  • Meet the Staff and Students
  • ACHORD Accolades
  • Other ACHORD News
  • Events

Previous Issues

  • Summer 2013
  • Spring 2013
  • December 2012
  • September 2012
  • April 2012
  • December 2011
  • all previous issues

ACHORD Seen & Heard

Recent Publications

Abdelmoneim AS, Eurich DT, Gamble JM, Simpson SH. Use patterns of antidiabetic regimens by patients with type 2 diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Dec;37(6):394-400. PMID: 24321720

Agborsangaya CB, Robitaille C, Dunbar P, Langlois MF, Leiter LA, Dai S, Pelletier C, Johnson JA. Self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes: Results of the 2011 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada. Health Rep 2013 24(6):3-8. PMID: 24258238

Agborsangaya CB, Ngwakongnwi E, Lahtinen M, Cooke T, Johnson JA. Multimorbidity prevalence in the general population: the role of obesity in chronic disease clustering. BMC Public Health 2013 Dec 10;13(1):1161. PMID: 24325303

Armstrong MJ, Sigal RJ. Physical Activity Clinical Practice Guidelines: What’s New in 2013? Can J Diabetes 2013;37(6)363-366.  PMID: 24321715

Ball GD, Farnesi BC, Newton AS, Holt NL, Geller J, Sharma AM, Johnson ST, Matteson CL, Finegood DT. Join the conversation! The development and preliminary application of conversation cards in pediatric weight management. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;45(5):476-8. PMID: 23602164

Beck CA, Southern DA, Saitz R, Knudtson ML, Ghali WA. Alcohol and drug use disorders among patients with myocardial infarction: associations with disparities in care and mortality. PLoS One. 2013 Sep 11;8(9):e66551. PMID: 24039695

Colmers IN, Majumdar SR, Yasui Y, Bowker SL, Marra CA, Johnson JA. Detection Bias and Overestimation of Bladder Cancer Risk in Type 2 Diabetes: A Matched Cohort Study. Diabetes Care 2013 36(10):3070-5. PMID: 23990517

Eurich DT, Lee C, Marrie TJ, Majumdar SR. Inhaled corticosteroids and risk of recurrent pneumonia: a population-based, nested case-control study. Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Oct;57(8):1138-44. PMID: 23872948

Gazala S, Pelletier JS, Storie D, Johnson JA, Kutsogiannis DJ, Bedard ELR. A systematic review and meta-analysis to assess patient-reported outcomes after lung cancer surgery. Scientific World J 2013 Nov 3;2013:789625. PMID: 24302870

Leung AA, Southern DA, Galbraith PD, Knudtson ML, Philpott AC, Ghali WA; APPROACH Investigators. Time Dependency of Outcomes for Drug-Eluting vs Bare-Metal Stents. Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1616-22. PMID: 24267804

Majumdar SR, Hemmelgarn BR, Lin M, McBrien K, Manns BJ, Tonelli M. Hypoglycemia associated with hospitalization and adverse events in older people: population-based cohort study. Diabetes Care. 2013 Nov;36(11):3585-90. PMID: 24089536

Nerenberg KA, Johnson JA, Leung B, Savu A, Ryan EA, Chik CL, Kaul P. Risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia over the last decade in a cohort of Alberta women. J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2013;35(11):986-94. PMID: 24246398

Ng E, Vanderloo S, Geiss L, Johnson JA. Concordance between self-report and a survey-based algorithm for classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes using the 2011 population-based Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada Diabetes Component (SLCDC-Diabetes). Can J Diabetes 2013 37(4):249-53. PMID: 24070889

Ouzounian M, Ghali W, Yip AM, Buth KJ, Humphries K, Stukel TA, Norris CM, Southern DA, Galbraith PD, Thompson CR, Abel J, Love MP, Hassan A, Hirsch GM. Determinants of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention vs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Interprovincial Comparison. Can J Cardiol. 2013 Nov;29(11):1454-61. PMID: 23927867

Padwal RS, Sharma AM, Fradette M, Jelinski S, Klarenbach S, Edwards A, Majumdar SR. The evaluating self-management and educational support in severely obese patients awaiting multidisciplinary bariatric care (EVOLUTION) trial: rationale and design. BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Aug 17;13:321. PMID: 24059346

Riddell MC, Sigal RJ. Physical Activity, Exercise and Diabetes. Can J Diabetes 2013;37(6)359-360.  PMID: 24321713

Tulloch H, Sweet SN, Fortier M, Capstick G, Kenny GP, Sigal RJ. Exercise Facilitators and Barriers from Adoption to Maintenance in the Diabetes Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Trial. Can J Diabetes 2013;37(6)367-274.  PMID: 24321716

Walker RL, Chen G, McAlister FA, Campbell NR, Hemmelgarn BR, Dixon E, Ghali W, Rabi D, Tu K, Jette N, Quan H; Hypertension Outcome and Surveillance Team. Hospitalization for Uncomplicated Hypertension: An Ambulatory Care Sensitive Condition. Can J Cardiol. 2013 Nov;29(11):1462-9.  PMID: 23916738

Recent Presentations

Al Sayah F, Majumdar SR, Wozniak L, Rees S, Johnson JA. Patients’ Assessment of Chronic Illness Care: Results from a Controlled Implementation Trial of a Collaborative Primary Care Team Model for Diabetes and Depression. 16th Annual CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S41.

Al Sayah F, Williams B, Pederson J, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA. Nurses’ Interaction with Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care Settings: Insights into Communication Loops, Jargon, and Health Literacy. [Oral Presentation] 5th Annual Health Literacy Research conference, Washington DC, Oct 2013.

Al Sayah F, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA. Lack of Association between Inadequate Health Literacy and Health Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Depression: Secondary Analysis of A controlled Trial. 5th Annual Health Literacy Research conference, Washington DC, Oct 2013.

Al Sayah F, Williams B, Pederson J, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA. Nurses’ Interaction with Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care Settings: Insights into Communication Loops, Jargon, and Health Literacy. [Oral Presentation] Accelerating Primary Care Conference, Edmonton AB, Dec 1-3, 2013.

Al Sayah F, Majumdar SR, Wozniak L, Rees S, Johnson JA. Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care with the Teamcare-PCN study: A Controlled Trial of a Collaborative Care Model for Patient with Diabetes and Depression. [Oral Presentation] Accelerating Primary Care Conference, Edmonton AB, Dec 1-3, 2013.

Armstrong MJ, Campbell TS, Lewin AM, Khandwala F, S. Culos-Reed SN, Sigal RJ. Motivational Interviewing-Based Exercise Counselling Promotes Maintenance of Physical Activity in People with Type 2 Diabetes. 16th Annual CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes 2013 Oct;37(S4):S3.

Avedzi MH, Mathe N, Mundt C, Johnson JA, Johnson ST. Dietary intake among adults with type 2 diabetes measured using the modified Block fat/sugar/fruit/vegetable screener. Alberta Diabetes Institute Research Day, University of Alberta, September 24, 2013, Edmonton, AB.

Avedzi HM, Mathe N, Mundt C, Johnson JA, Johnson ST. Dietary Intake of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Measured Using the Modified Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. 16th Annual CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S71.

Kaul P, Savu A, Nerenberg KA, Donovan LE, Chik CL, Ryan E, Johnson JA. Interaction Between Maternal Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Long-Term Development of Diabetes, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease: A Population-Level Analysis. 16th Annual CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S4.

Johnson JA, Al Sayah F, Qiu W, Rees S, Majumdar SR. Screening and Follow-up as Effective as a Collaborative Primary Care Model for Improving Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Depression and Diabetes: Results of a Controlled Trial. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S41.

Johnson JA, Sayah FA, Rees S, Qiu W, Chik C, Chue P, Florence P, Jacquier J, Lysak P, Opengenorth A, Katon W, Majumdar SR. Screening and Follow-up as Effective as Collaborative Primary Care Models for Patients with Depression and Diabetes: Results of a Controlled Trial. 16th Annual CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S41.

Johnson JA, Al Sayah F, Rees S, Qiu W, Chik C, Chue P, Florence P, Jacquier J, Lysak P, Opengenorth A, Katon W, Majumdar SR. Effectiveness of a Collaborative Primary Care Model for Patients with Diabetes and Depression: Results of a Controlled Trial. Accelerating Primary Care Conference, Edmonton AB, Dec 1-3, 2013.

Lee J, Abdelmoniem AS, Featherstone T, Simpson SH. The risk of mortality varies amongst sulfonylureas: a meta-analysis of controlled studies. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes 2013 Oct;37(S4):S75-6.

Omran D, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA, Tsuyuki RT, Lewanczuk RZ, Guirguis LM, Makowsky M, Simpson SH. Effect of Adding Pharmacists to Primary Care Teams on Medication Management and Adherence to Achieve Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S48.

Sahnan A, Simpson SH. The fear and pain associated with injection and fingertip lancing: impact of an experiential exercise for pharmacy students. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes 2013 Oct;37(S4):S21-2.

Tran BX, Ohinmaa A, Kuhle S, Johnson JA. Cost-effectiveness of school-based health promotion in Canada: A life-course modeling approach. ISPOR 16th Annual European Congress, The Convention Centre, Dublin, November 2-6, 2013. Value in Health 2013; 16 :7:A391. (Poster online)

Warkentin LM, Das D, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA, Padwal RS. The Effect of Weight Loss on Health-Related Quality of Life: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of randomized trials. Alberta Diabetes Institute Research Day, University of Alberta. September 24, 2013, Edmonton, AB.

Weir DL, McAlister FA, Senthilselvan A, Sandhu-Minhas JK, Eurich DT. The comparative safety and effectiveness of sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes and heart failure. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes 2013 Oct;37(S4):S45.

 

Events

11th Annual ACHORD Retreat

March 6-7, 2014
The Banff Centre
Banff, Alberta, Canada

 

 

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Report from the Chair

Hello everyone!  The New Year is around the corner, and ACHORD has had another busy year! Here is a quick update on what we have been doing since our last newsletter.

ACHORD members have attended various meetings/conferences this fall. Some of the events that have been attended by ACHORD members are: ISPE meeting, the EuroQol Group Annual Meeting; the EASD Meeting held in Barcelona, Spain, the Health Literacy Research Conference, the CDA Annual Meeting and the Accelerating Primary Care 2013 Meeting. I just returned from the IDEG and World Diabetes Congress of the IDF held in Melbourne, Australia.

My work with the Obesity, Diabetes and Nutrition Strategic Clinical Network (ODN SCN) is continuing on with focused discussions to highlight priorities for our respective SCN. AIHS launched the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Health System (PRIHS) grants this year, to stimulate research in the SCNs. We developed two PRIHS grants for the ODN SCN, one focused on care and management of gestational diabetes (co-lead with Lois Donovan in Calgary) and the other on care and rehabilitation of severely obese patients in tertiary care centers in Alberta (co-lead with Mary Forhan and Arya Sharma). Results from this PRIHS competition will be announced before the holidays, and we anticipate a second PRIHS competition in the New Year.

We have also been busy in the past month preparing an application for the AIHS CRIO Team grant competition, which ACHORD was one of the 24 letters of intent invited for a full proposal. This application went in to AIHS on December 6.  If successful, this grant would provide funding of $5 million over 5 years.  We look forward to hearing positive results in the spring of 2014.

The Alberta’s Caring for Diabetes project team remains busy. Data analysis and results dissemination continues for the HEALD and TeamCare interventions.  The Aquatic Physical Exercise for arthritis and Diabetes (APEXD) classes are wrapping up with final data collection appointments to be completed in late winter. A new project, Prescription to Get Active (Rx2GA), is now underway in partnership with the Leduc Beaumont Devon PCN. Family physicians are supplied with prescription pads for physical activity, and patients receive a one-month free membership at a local recreation facility with the prescription. Participants are randomly assigned to receive or not receive activity reminders via text message or telephone call; perfect timing for those with physical activity as a new year’s resolution.

The ABCD Cohort study is nearing the end of recruitment, closing at the end of December 2013. I’m happy to report that over 2000 people with type 2 diabetes around the province have joined the study, with some people moving into Year 3 shortly. We look forward to following this cohort over the next several years, giving us valuable data on care and outcomes for people living with diabetes in Alberta.

I hope the information in our newsletter is informative, and if you have any questions about our activities, please do not hesitate to contact us. I would like to take this time to wish each and every one of you all the best in the holiday season and a fantastic New Year!

 

Project Update

Screening The Cardiovascular Safety of Sulfonylureas: An Unsettled Controversy.

By Ahmed Abdelmoneim
What?

The cardiovascular safety of sulfonylureas, an oral antidiabetic drug used for management of type 2 diabetes, has been a contentious issue for over 40 years. Debate began with publication of the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP) in 1970 that reported an increased risk of cardiovascular death in patients taking tolbutamide compared to placebo. Based on these findings, the United States Food and Drug Association required a black-box warning on all sulfonylurea packaging. Although the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study, published in 1998, seemed to quell concerns about cardiovascular risk associated with sulfonylureas, the topic was re-ignited in 2007 when a meta-analysis of thiazolidinediones linked use of these antidiabetic drugs with a higher risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. This meta-analysis raised the question of cardiovascular safety for all antidiabetic drugs, especially the long-debated cardiovascular effects of sulfonylureas.

Since 2007, there have been a number of observational studies and, more recently, meta-analyses, examining the possible adverse cardiovascular effects of sulfonylureas. However, the inconsistent findings and limitations of the study designs used have only aggravated the debate rather than provided clear direction.

So What?

Sulfonylureas are commonly used to help control blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite the well-recognized side effects like hypoglycemia, weight gain, and secondary failure/pancreas exhaustion, clinical practice guidelines continue to recommend sulfonylureas as second-line therapy when metformin fails, and even as first-line agents under certain circumstances. Perhaps the popularity of sulfonylureas is based on familiarity, reliable efficacy to reduce glycaemia and availability at low cost. Establishing a tangible link between these drugs and adverse cardiovascular outcomes will impact millions of patients with type 2 diabetes who depend on sulfonylureas to maintain glycemic control. This is especially important since the safety of newer antidiabetic drugs still under investigation.

Since the UGDP trial, there has not been any major long-term cardiovascular outcomes trial that specifically evaluated sulfonylureas. In fact, most RCTs involving sulfonylureas were small in size with short duration of follow up and they were not powered to measure cardiovascular outcomes. Other RCTs, such as ADVANCE or ACCORD, focused mainly on evaluating the effect of intensive glycemic control rather than assessing the safety of a particular antidiabetic drug. Likewise, observational studies have important limitations that make them often seen as hypothesis-generating rather than establishing a strong causal link. In addition to these concerns, many studies have grouped sulfonylureas together as a class and ignored the potential differences between individual sulfonylureas. Several in vitro, animal, and clinical studies have demonstrated important differences in tissue specificity of sulfonylureas (for example, glyburide binds to sulfonylurea receptors on the heart and pancreas, while gliclazide binds selectively to pancreatic sulfonylurea receptors), and risk of hypoglycaemia (with glyburide having the highest risk amongst all sulfonylureas). We have considered these differences when examining adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with sulfonylureas and observed important differences in risk between glyburide and gliclazide.

Now what?

Despite a large number of clinical trials and observational studies in this area, we still lack strong evidence to support or refute concerns about adverse cardiovascular effects associated with sulfonylureas. Two current clinical trials, the CAROLINA (NCT01243424) and TOSCA.IT (NCT00700856), might help provide some answers because they are examining the risk of cardiovascular outcomes between sulfonylureas and other oral antidiabetic drugs, as well as placebo. Unfortunately, neither trial will provide definitive evidence about the relative effects amongst sulfonylureas. The CAROLINA trial is randomly allocating patients to linagliptin, glimepiride, or placebo. Given the possible differences amongst sulfonylureas, results from the CAROLINA trial may not be extrapolated to other sulfonylureas. Although the TOSCA.IT study is using three different sulfonylureas, patients randomly allocated to the sulfonylurea arm will receive glyburide, gliclazide, or glimepiride based on the discretion of treating physician. Since patients are not randomly assigned a specific sulfonylurea, there may be selection bias. In addition, the TOSCA.IT study is not powered to compare risk of adverse cardiovascular events amongst individual sulfonylureas.

To help address the question about the relative safety of sulfonylureas, we need a comparative effectiveness clinical trial that is specifically designed to explore the cardiovascular risk difference between sulfonylureas. We believe an ideal study would randomly allocate patients to two sulfonylureas with different pharmacologic properties (e.g., glyburide and gliclazide) or placebo. Feasibility of a study specifically examining the cardiovascular safety of sulfonylureas alone, however, is questionable since there are no incentives for industry to sponsor such a trial.

 

Recent Literature from the ACHORD Journal Club

(Paper discussed Tuesday, November 5, 2013; Commentary by Nonsikelelo Mathe)

Pan A, Sun Q, Bernstein AM, Manson JE, Willett WC, Hu FB. Changes in Red Meat Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Three Cohorts of US Men and Women. JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173(14):1328-1335  PMID: 23779232.

Rationale for the study?

The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between changes in red meat consumption during a 4-year period and the subsequent risk of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in US Adults.

Summary of the study

Using data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, the Nurses Health Study, and the Nurses Health Study II the authors determined the relationship between red meat consumption and subsequent risk of T2DM. The sample included almost 2 million person-years of follow up in adults aged 25-75 years, with 7540 incident cases of T2DM identified via self-report and confirmed with a secondary questionnaire. The explanatory variable, red meat consumption, was determined based on the use of a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire that was administered every 4 years. There were also multiple confounding or mediating covariates (such as body weight, smoking, physical activity level) that were assessed through the questionnaire.
The authors fitted time-dependent cox proportional hazard regressions to model (1) change in red meat consumption over four years, to estimate the hazard ratio of T2DM in the subsequent four years, and model (2) change in red meat consumption over four years, to estimate the hazard ratio of T2DM in the all follow up years. Inverse variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis was used to combine results from all three studies. It was observed that increases in red meat consumption were positively associated with a subsequent 4-year risk of T2DM, that was partially mediated by body weight. Decreasing red meat intake was not associated with a reduced 4-year risk of T2DM.

Discussion

The authors described a long-term association between red meat consumption and increased risk of diabetes, which was only partially mediated by weight gain in a large sample of US adults. Red meat included beef, pork, lamb as main dish, mixed dishes or sandwiches. Processed red meat included bacon, hot dogs, bologna and other processed red meats. However, this description of red meat as a category of food, may be misleading[1].  Firstly, these findings imply that the redness in the meat may be the factor associated with increased the risk of diabetes; however, redness in meat is determined by its myoglobin and hemoglobin content and there is little evidence that these are associated with diabetes risk[1]. Secondly, in exploring the relationships between diet and disease, it is common to examine the relationship between a single nutrient of a single food group and a particular disease state. However, single nutrients or foods may not be responsible for the diet-disease relationships. This is because foods and nutrients are not consumed in isolation. A diet high in processed meats may also contain large amounts of high-fat dairy and low vegetable and fruits intake. These other dietary factors my influence the relationship between diet intake and disease.

References

1. Evans WJ: Oxygen-carrying proteins in meat and risk of diabetes mellitus. JAMA internal medicine 2013, 173(14):1335-1336.

 

Meet the Staff and Students

Jennifer Seida, BHSc, MPH

Research Associate

Jennifer comes to ACHORD with six years of experience as a project manager in systematic reviews research at the Alberta Research Center for Health Evidence. For the past five years, she has also served as a clinical reviewer for the Common Drug Review of the Canadian Agency of Drugs and Technologies in Health. Jennifer completed her Master of Public Health in clinical epidemiology at the University of Alberta in 2008. Previously, she completed a Bachelor of Health Sciences honours degree at McMaster University. Her main interests include evidence synthesis, research methodology, and project management.

Jennifer is excited to work with the ACHORD team. She looks forward to contributing and continuing to develop her skills through her involvement in the Obesity, Diabetes, and Nutrition Strategic Clinical Network (ODN SCN).

In her spare time, Jennifer enjoys teaching children and teens through church activities and exploring the world with her active twin toddlers.

 

Lindsey Warkentin, BSc (Honours)

Training Program:  MSc in Medicine

Specialization: Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta

Lindsey was born and raised in Sherwood Park, Alberta. She completed a Bachelor of Science Honours degree in Psychology at the University of Alberta and did an undergraduate honors thesis researching iron chelation after stroke, in rats. She then moved away from bench science and began working as a clinical research coordinator in conjunction with Alberta Health Services and the Department of Nephrology overseeing multiple grant and industry sponsored clinical trials in the area of kidney transplantation.

Lindsey started her Master of Science in Medicine in September 2012, working with Drs. Raj Padwal and Sumit Majumdar to assess the effects of weight loss on health-related quality of life. She is particularly interested in determining the threshold of weight loss needed to generate clinically meaningful quality of life changes, as well as assessing what other factors impact health-related quality of life change beyond weight loss itself.

Lindsey is thrilled to be part of the ACHORD team, and is looking forward to collaborating and learning from this highly experienced group.

 

Karly Achtymichuk, BSc Pharmacy

Training Program:  MSc Clinical Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alberta


Karly was raised on a farm in rural Alberta. She graduated from the University of Alberta in 2010 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy and worked for three years as a clinical pharmacist at the Grey Nuns Community Hospital. As part of a multi-disciplinary team in the area of internal medicine, Karly continually saw the burden of chronic disease on both patients and the healthcare system. Karly returned to the University of Alberta in 2013 to pursue her Master of Science under the supervision of Dr. Dean Eurich and is excited to gain experience in research with the ACHORD group. Her research will be around influenza vaccination in the type 2 diabetic population in Alberta.

Outside of her interests in healthcare and pharmacy, Karly enjoys running, yoga and travelling. She has run two full marathons and is now training for triathlons. Her travels have taken her across Canada and the United States as well as through Europe.

 

Recent Presentations (Cont)

Weir DL, Majumdar SR, McAlister FA, Eurich DT. “The Impact of Continuity of Care in Diabetic Patients with Multimorbidity”. Alberta Diabetes Institute Research Day. University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. September 24, 2013. Also presented at the National Forum on Public Health, School of Public Health. Lister Conference Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB. Nov 13, 2013.

Wozniak L, Pederson J, Mundt C, Soprovich A, Plotnikoff R, Johnson JA, Johnson ST. 6-month Follow-up among Participants from the Healthy Eating and Active Living for Diabetes in Primary Care Networks Trial: A Qualitative Study. 16th CDA/CSEM Professional Conference & Annual Meetings, Montreal, QC October 17-20, 2013. Can J Diabetes. 2013 Oct;37(S4):S19.

Wozniak L, Mladenovic A, Pederson J, Mundt C, Soprovich A, Plotnikoff R, Johnson JA, & Johnson ST (2013). Participant experiences of HEALD-PCN: A qualitative study on perceived effectiveness and maintenance of self-management behaviours related to diabetes.  Accelerating Primary Care Conference, Edmonton, AB, December 1-3, 2013.

 

ACHORD Accolades

Congratulations to the following faculty/students/trainees on their latest accomplishments:

Fatima Al Sayah on successfully completing her PhD Final Exam

Lindsey Warkentin on receiving an an Honourable Mention Award for her presentation at the Alberta Diabetes Institute Research day

Scot Simpson on his promotion to Professor in the faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Dr. Fatima Al Sayah, Dr. Jongnam Hwang and Gaetanne Murphy on their recent convocation

Dima Omran on successfully completing her MSc Final Exam

Mu Lin on successfully completing his PhD Final Exam

Ahmed Abdelmoniem on successfully completing his PhD Candidacy Exam

 

Other ACHORD News

Congratulations to:

Fatima Al Sayah on her engagement to Hisham Hussein

 

 Gingerbread House Construction 2013

 

ACHORD Contact Information

Phone Numbers: General Inquiries: 780-248-1010 | Fax : 780-492-7455
Address:
University of Alberta | 2-040 Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Research Innovation | Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1
Email
: achord@ualberta.ca